New research shows over 500 Kenilworth children growing up in poverty

Kenilworth Labour Branch has highlighted research from the End Child Poverty Coalition which has revealed that there are approximately 500 children growing up in poverty in Kenilworth.

In 2010 End Child Poverty figures reveals only 5% of children living in poverty, which would equate to about 205 children and now in 2017, the figure could have risen by as much as 335 to around 540 children living in families existing below the poverty line.

Kevin Purdy, Chairman of Kenilworth Labour said:

“Whilst it is encouraging that Kenilworth has one of the lowest levels of child poverty in the UK, it is still shocking in such as affluent community there are well over 500 children living in families who are struggling to heat their homes or put food on the table.”

“There can be little doubt that the Government’s policy of austerity, which has frozen benefits has pushed many families into a position where they can’t pay for essentials and children will be suffering.”

“Seven years of flat wages and cuts with inflation now pushing up the cost of household essentials has meant that 300 plus children have been pushed into poverty in Kenilworth since 2010.  The roll out of Universal Credit will make the problem bigger.

This Government should stand aside and let Labour deliver a £10 minimum wage, end zero hours contract and transform our social security system.  These are the changes we need to make sure all the children in our community get a decent start in life.”

 …

The End Child Poverty coalition has published figures providing a new Child Poverty map of the UK.  The new figures reveal that there are now constituencies within the UK where more than half of children are growing up in poverty – compared to one in ten, in the areas with the lowest child poverty rates. http://www.endchildpoverty.org.uk/poverty-in-your-area-2018/

A child is said to live in poverty if they are in a family living on less than 60% of median household income. According to the latest official statistics 60% of median income (after housing costs) was around £248 per week.

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